Intel’s Skylake Processor Lineup for MacBook Air Unveiled – Mac Rumors

It’s not going to happen, but boy do I wish Intel would do something about their confusing naming schemes.

It was bad enough that we’re now up to six generations of “Core i3/5/7″ processors, the only way to differentiate between which is a somewhat random part number that means nothing unless you look it up in Intel’s Ark, or an arbitrary code name that isn’t printed anywhere on the box.

Now they’ve dropped a zero from the GPU model numbers they’ve been using for years, which adds additional confusion to anybody who doesn’t actively follow these things. “No, no, that’s a 520, which is newer and much faster than a 5200.”

It’s not that the information is impossible to come up with in most cases (apart from computers that come with a “Core i5″ CPU without specifying in any way what generation or model it is), but it’s needlessly confusing, particularly for the not-wildly technical. “Well, yes, they both say “Core i7″ on them, and the GHz number is the same, but this one is way faster because it’s actually three generations newer.” or “Yes, they both say “i5″, but this one has two cores and is a low-power mobile part, while this one has four cores and is a high-power desktop part. And also the generations are completely different.”

Even Apple, masters of opaque product names, has a model year associated with each “iMac”, has neatly sequentially numbered A-series processors, and their arbitrarily-named OSes have a simple version number to make it clear.

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