Top 5 Reasons Why CEOs Prefer Business Laptops – Tech Cocktail

There’s plenty of focus on the inner workings of businesses across the globe today. How they work, why companies choose to do certain things or adopt certain practices, who’s in charge—all these issues are coming under the scrutiny of the public. Consumers want to understand all aspects of the world of business executive, from what they wear, to what technology keeps them going. So why do corporate heavyweights prefer business laptops over consumer laptops? There are a wealth of reasons that people may invest in the higher price tag of a business model; here we’ll talk about the top 5 reasons why CEOs have expensive tastes when it comes to computers why you should adopt their considerations.

Business Laptop Versus Consumer Laptop: What’s the Difference?

Right about now you’re probably asking “what is the difference between business and consumer PCs?” Many people outside of management level occupations don’t even realize that there’s more than one class of laptop, but if you have a laptop that wasn’t purchased by an IT department for work use then you probably have a consumer model. They’re readily available, and as technology advances, they’re also getting smaller and more affordable by the day. Consumer models come with competitive specs, the promise of simple upgrades, enough software to have merited the coining of the phrase “bloatware”, and a battery that’s passable for a few solid hours of computer time.

Business models, on the other hand, include a few key differences that set them apart from their counterparts, starting from the frame and working up from there. In fact, the things that set a business model laptop apart from a consumer version of the same laptop encompass exactly the reasons why a busy CEO would choose the elevated price tag over an off the shelf consumer solution.

1. Durability

One of the primary criticisms electronics seem to garner is when they feel as if they’re made “cheaply.” It’s popular to design business laptopss in aluminum or magnesium frames to protect internal components and avoid feeling or looking cheap. A busy executive isn’t going to always have time to kid-glove his computer and something that can stand up to bumps, jostle, and even take a dive to the floor is a good idea. Options exist like the fully-rugged or semi-rugged tough laptops from Panasonic that both feel and look sturdier – they’re more durable and will ultimately last longer. The Dell Latitude and Ultrabook series are some popular names, as well.

2. Battery Life

CEOs generally travel more frequently than others in the company, and they don’t always have time to stop and recharge themselves, let alone their electronics. Business laptops were designed for these types of go-getters. To address the many demands of a CEO throughout the day, many business laptop models come with larger batteries or more than one battery. These sorts of standards make purchasing a business laptop better even for consumers on the go.

3. Connectivity

CEOs need to be connected, and not just via cellular phone or wireless receiver. Because they travel to board rooms, offices, and conduct presentations all across the world, they need to have a laptop that not only keeps up also but keeps them connected. Standard laptops have cut the number of ports on their consumer laptops, but business laptops have preserved them, usually including the age-old VGA port alongside the new HDMI standard ports to make sure that users can stay connected to whatever technology is present.

4. Warranty

When you’re spending a lot of money on something, you want to know your investment is protected. CEOs of the largest companies in today’s world might not have to worry about the cost of replacing one laptop, but they do worry about their work being protected. Business laptops are warrantied on average, three times longer than their consumer counterparts. Warranties cover parts, services and sometimes even data, which corporate users would be very interested in keeping secure and safe.

5. Features

We already mentioned bloatware, and if you’re a consumer that finds all that dead weight to be frustrating when you purchase a new laptop, looking into a business model might just restore your faith in electronics. Business models come with less bloatware, because IT departments don’t have time to sit down with hundreds or even just ten new laptops a week and remove all the extra programs, samples and trial software that consumer models come with. Instead, companies with business models generally try to include features and peripherals that corporate users would want, like fingerprint scanners, remote access software and the Professional versions of operating systems and other software.

Conclusion

If you’re not a power user, there’s a good chance the reasons in this article don’t pertain to you; standard one year warranties, bloatware, and easily cracked cases might not be too big of an issue for you. But for consumers that like to know their money is going to something that’s designed to last and provide them with functionality for more than just a year, it’s a good idea to start looking into the business side of the mobile computing competition.

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