The New York Times spent six weeks interviewing more than 50 people to get a glimpse of Donald Trump’s private behavior with women over the past 40 years. What the paper found is not flattering.

The accounts “reveal unwelcome romantic advances, unending commentary on the female form, a shrewd reliance on ambitious women, and unsettling workplace conduct, according to the interviews, as well as court records and written recollections,” the Times reports.

Temple Taggart, then 21-year-old Miss Utah, told the paper she was surprised when Trump, who had purchased the pageant, kissed her on the lips when she first met him.

Taggart, who said it happened a second time, said she thought “Oh my God, gross.” Trump disputed the story.

Brook Antoinette Mahealani Lee said when she was Miss Universe she was sitting next to Trump in the audience at the 1997 Miss Teen USA pageant when Trump’s daughter, Ivanka, was on stage helping to host the event.

She said he turned to her and asked for her opinion of Ivanka’s body. “‘Don’t you think my daughter’s hot? She’s hot, right?'” Lee recalled him saying. Ivanka was 16 at the time and Lee thought the comments were “creepy.”

Trump, the story points out, did put women in charge of key parts of his business empire earlier in his career, including hiring Barbara Res as his head of construction in the early 1980s. But Res recalls several disturbing incidents including one where during an interview with an architect he commented on the fitness of women in Marina del Ray, Calif. “They take care of their asses,” she reported Trump saying. Later, when Res gained significant weight, Trump commented to her: “You like your candy.”

It was one of numerous examples of shaming women for being overweight. After Alicia Machado won the 1996 Miss Universe title, she gained weight and said that Trump arranged for her to go a gym where the media — along with Trump — were there to document her weight gain. Trump admitted that he pushed Machado to lose weight and expressed no regret for his tactic.

Most seriously, the story cites an incident in which his first wife, Ivana, claimed that he had raped her while they were married. Ivana later backed off that description and more recently said the story was “without merit.”

Trump sees himself as a promoter of women and several who worked with him agree. Jill Martin, a vice president, said Trump was supportive of her decision to have two children over the past five years. Louise Sunshine, who worked for Trump for 15 years, and Res both said they were grateful for the chances they were given by Trump.

Trump also gave Ivana important assignments including having her run one of his casinos and then the Plaza Hotel. But that was a big mistake, he concluded in his book, The Art of the Comeback, because when he got home at night she wanted to discuss business and not the “softer subjects of life.”

Reaction to the Times story, as one would expect, ranged from disgust to accusations the paper is out to get Trump.

“A bombshell from @nytimes: Apparently, Donald Trump is often a jerk to women. I know, shocking, right?” one person identifying himself as The Rude Pundit (@rudepundit) tweeted.

But another identifying himself as Christopher Bowen using the handle @bowenswharf tweeted that the story was: “So pathetic. This will backfire like every other hit piece at which you’ve epically failed.”

For his part, Trump, never shy to criticize media coverage, has yet to weigh in on the piece.