MH370 search in the wrong place – NEWS.com.au

Wrong area ... Dutch experts Marten van Ormondt and Fedor Baart say their research shows

Wrong area … Dutch experts Marten van Ormondt and Fedor Baart say their research shows that authorities are looking in the wrong place (Reunion Island) for missing flight MH370. Picture: AP
Source: AP



AS the world waits for the French to declare the origins of a Boeing 777 flaperon, a group of Dutch hydrodynamic experts has released modelling they believe shows the MH370 search is occurring in the wrong place.


The engineers from independent research institute Deltares, produced the simulation model based on the belief the wing flap is from the missing aircraft.

Using their knowledge of surface currents, Marten van Ormondt and Fedor Baart found that particles released in the northern part of the search off central Western Australia reached the coast of Reunion Island within a year of release.

“Those released at the southern section do not travel as far and do not make it to Africa within the simulation period,” the researchers said.

Older models ... Three-dimensional models of the sea floor terrain show original MH370 se

Older models … Three-dimensional models of the sea floor terrain show original MH370 search area. Picture: Supplied
Source: Supplied

London-based Australian oceanographer Erik van Sebille has also suggested the arrival of possible MH370 debris on Reunion Island last week indicated it came from an area to the north of where the search is currently focused.

The much publicised modelling undertaken by the University of Western Australia a year ago forecast debris from the Southern Indian Ocean would not reach Madagascar (near Reunion) for 18 to 24 months.

It will be 17-months on Saturday that the Malaysia Airlines’ Boeing 777 disappeared after going dramatically off course in a routine flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

MH370 search in the wrong place

Possible evidence … French police officers carry a piece of debris from a plane in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island, which could possibly be that of missing flight MH370. Picture: AP
Source: AP

Authorities including the Australian Transport Safety Bureau have been unable to explain the disappearance, but have said it was most likely a deliberate act by someone with extensive aircraft knowledge.

There were 239 people on board the plane including six Australians.

An underwater search of the Southern Indian Ocean had been underway since last October.

Despite covering an area close to the size of Tasmania, nothing has been found other than an uncharted shipwreck.

A little over 60,000 square kilometres is left to be searched and the Australian Transport Safety Bureau chief Commissioner Martin Dolan is confident the wreckage will be found in that area.

The search zone was established through painstaking analysis of a series of satellite handshakes with MH370, which placed the aircraft at various points of an arc in the Indian Ocean.

Comments

Write a Reply or Comment:

Your email address will not be published.*