Malcolm Turnbull in his blue suit and purple tie with Julie Bishop as he was sworn in as Prime Minister in Canberra.

Malcolm Turnbull in his blue suit and purple tie with Julie Bishop as he was sworn in as Prime Minister in Canberra. Photo: Andrew Meares

From a style perspective, during his time in office Tony Abbott and blue ties went together like Diane Von Furstenburg and wrap dresses, but new Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull put a stop to that trend during his first day on the job.

Considering the swearing in ceremony at Government House is becoming such an regular annual occurrence it could pass as an on-schedule event at Fashion Week these days, it would be remiss of me not to mention the looks that were showcased.

While this time we didn’t have bright and bold fashion lover Dame Quentin Bryce officiating proceedings we did have colour and clashing prints on display thanks to the Prime Minister’s family and the Governor General’s wife Lady Lynne Cosgrove.

Malcolm Turnbull is sworn in as the 29th Prime Minister of Australia by Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove watched by daughter Daisy and grandson Jack son in law James Brown at Government House.

Malcolm Turnbull is sworn in as the 29th Prime Minister of Australia by Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove watched by daughter Daisy and grandson Jack son in law James Brown at Government House. Photo: Andrew Meares

But it was Turnbull who raised eyebrows and turned heads during his first official day as our 29th Prime Minister by thumbing his nose at the coalition’s unofficial blue tie uniform and opting to accessorise his deep imperial blue (no doubt Savile Row) suit with a purple thatched patterned tie.

Like florals are for spring (as worn by Daisy Turnbull), mauve on men is hardly groundbreaking. However one can’t overlook the significance of the colour, a colour which only three weeks ago was given its own movement – Wear It Purple Day – in support of the LBGTI community and for young people with different sex, sexuality and gender identities.

However Turnbull’s tie was perhaps mere coincidence or convenience given when pressed about his stance on marriage equality he confirmed he will be toeing the party line and moving ahead with Abbott’s proposed plebiscite.

A more expensive option, he acknowledged during question time, but at least it will allow the voting public to have a say, even though the democratic state of Australia right now is underpinned by six leadership spills in five years, but who (other than Russia) is counting?

Purple ties, Lucy Turnbull’s bold prints and Julie Bishop’s chic Claire Underwood inspired power suit aside, 2-year-old Jack Turnbull-Brown was the true star of Tuesday’s stuffy proceedings at Yarralumla.

The cooing of a toddler, rather than heckling from Canning constituents in cars, is a more suitable backing track for a Prime Minister.