Gun myths and preventing death: 6 things to know about mass shootings in America – Salon


By contrast, restrictive gun licensing laws refer to a system in which individuals who want to purchase firearms must demonstrate to a licensing authority that they have valid reasons to get a gun — like using it on a shooting range or going hunting – and that they demonstrate “good character.”


The type of gun law adopted has important impacts. Countries with more restrictive gun licensing laws show fewer deaths by firearms and a lower gun ownership rate.


#4: Background checks work


In most restrictive background checks performed in developed countries, citizens are required to train for gun handling, obtain a license for hunting or provide proof of membership to a shooting range.


Individuals must prove that they do not belong to any “prohibited group,” such as the mentally ill, criminals, children or those at high risk of committing violent crime, such as individuals with a police record of threatening the life of another.


Here’s the bottom line. With these provisions, most U.S. active shooters would have been denied the purchase of a firearm.


#5: Not all mass shootings are terrorism


Journalists sometimes describe mass shooting as a form of domestic terrorism. This connection may be misleading.


There is no doubt that mass shootings are “terrifying” and “terrorize” the community where they have happened. However, not all active shooters involved in mass shooting have a political message or cause.


For example, the church shooting in Charleston, South Carolina in June 2015 was a hate crime but was not judged by the federal government to be a terrorist act.

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