30 killed in twin bombings near main train station in Turkey’s capital – CNN

No group has claimed responsibility for the attack yet, though suspicion immediately fell on the ISIS terrorist group, or on Kurdish separatists in Turkey.

Turkey has avoided conflict with ISIS, perhaps in exchange for the release earlier this year of dozens of Turkish hostages seized in the Iraqi city of Mosul. The quid pro quo of that deal has never been announced.

However, Turkey recently changed its stance and allowed the U.S. to launch strikes on ISIS from the Incirlik Air Base in southern Turkey.

Is Turkey hurting ISIS?

Some observers predicted at the time that Turkey might be subject to terrorist attacks because of its newly aggressive stance toward ISIS.

In an interview with CNN in July, Esra Ozyurek, chair of Contemporary Turkish Studies at the London School of Economics, said that attacks in Turkey, or the lack of them, would indicate whether ISIS was being hurt by the strikes based out of Turkey.

“If Turkey’s really hurting ISIS, then there will be attacks,” Ozyurek said.

But there is no indication yet on who was responsible for Saturday’s bombing.

Many Turks have joined ISIS’ ranks, with some recruiting their fellow citizens in Ankara, according to reports. Turks may make up a third of ISIS’ ranks, according to reports.

But other speculation involves Kurdish separatists. A peace process last year appeared to come close to an agreement.

But when the party of President Recep Tayyip Erdo─čan failed to win many votes in Kurdish areas of the country in June, he appeared to abandon the reconciliation process.

In return, hostilities that have killed tens of thousands of people since 1984 have been renewed.

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