Researchers make progress toward computer video recognition – PCWorld

Computers can already recognize you in an image, but can they see a video or real-world objects and tell exactly what’s going on?

Researchers are trying to make computer video recognition a reality, and they are using some image recognition techniques to make that happen.

Researchers in and outside of Google are making progress in video recognition, but there are also challenges to overcome, Rajat Monga, engineering director of TensorFlow for Google’s Brain team, said during a question-and-answer session on Quora this week.

The benefits of video recognition are enormous. For example, a computer will be able to identify a person’s activities, an event, or a location. Video recognition will also make self-driving cars more viable.

Video recognition has the potential of giving digital eyes to robots, which may then be able to do regular chores like laundry.

Image recognition is now common, but video recognition involves analyzing a string of related images bunched together in a sequence. Video recognition is akin to human vision, where we see a stream of related images, recognize objects immediately, and identify what’s going on around us.

Many gains in video recognition have come, thanks to advances in the deep-learning models driving image recognition.

“With the sequence of frames in each video that are related to each other, it provides a much richer perspective of the real world, allowing the models to create a 3D view of the world, without necessarily needing stereo vision,” said Monga, who leads up TensorFlow, an open-source machine-learning software stack from Google.

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